FAQ


What is the time difference?

Turkey is on GMT + 2 (daylight saving = GMT +3 and operates between late March to late September). This means generally that Turkey is 1 hour ahead of European and 2 hours ahead of the UK standard times. Still it is a good idea to check the local time when you arrive in Turkey and adjust your watch accordingly.

Is there visa application requirement for entrance Turkey?

You can easily access the main information for visa application procedures in Turkey at www.mfa.gov.tr

Do I need any vaccinations before going to Turkey?

There are no mandatory vaccinations before traveling to Turkey.

Will I be able to use my mobile phone in Turkey?

Yes – providing your phone is international roaming enabled.
The 3 main GSM operators in Turkey are Turkcell, Avea and Vodafone and all GSM operators have roaming agreements with international operators.

What is the local currency in Turkey?

Turkish Lira (TL) is the local currency of the Republic of Turkey. Visitors can exchange their cash money for Turkish Lira at exchange offices and banks.

Can I use my Credit Card in Turkey?

Credit cards are accepted in most shops and restaurants in the main Cities or Resorts areas. This may not be the case in smaller villages or remote places so it is generally a good idea to try always to have some cash handy.

What are the opening hours of banks in Turkey?

In Turkey, banks are in service of their customers from 09.00 to 17.00 onweekdays but are closed on weekends.

Can I drive in Turkey with my driver’s license?

Foreigners may drive in Turkey provided that they keep their passport, international driver’s license and the vehicle license with them all the time. Turkey drives on the right side of the road and the advanced highway network allows easy access to different corners of the land.

What kind of sockets are used in Turkey?

European two-pin sockets are widely used in Turkey as everywhere in continental Europe.

Do I have to speak Turkish to interact with people during my visit?

English is the most spoken foreign language everywhere in Turkey. You should have no problem meeting people who can speak English and help you get around in all the big cities, shopping malls, restaurants and holiday resorts.

What are the opening and closing times of museums in Turkey?

All of the museums in Turkey are closed on Monday and are open to visitation from 9:00 to 17.00 on the other days.

What are the opening hours of shopping centers in Turkey?

In Turkey, shopping centers are open every day offering a variety of trademarks and services from usually from 10.00 am until 22.00 pm.

What to buy in Turkey and where to buy it?

Shopping is one of the great pleasures of a trip to Turkey and the rich variety of Turkish crafts makes it impossible to resist buying something. Fine apparel of silk, cotton, leather and wool; artful jewelry; leather accessories; brilliant faience (colored tiles); vessels of copper, brass, marble, meerschaum and alabaster worked by master artisans; and of course heirloom-quality Turkish carpets and kilims, are among the most popular purchases. Great value and an enjoyable shopping experience can be found everywhere, from small towns to big cities.

Unique regional handicrafts make shopping that much more enjoyable. Traditional Turkish handicrafts crafts including carpets, ceramics and pottery, tiles, copper items, woodcarvings, decorative glass, and embroidery are a major component of Turkish culture. They are a stunning reflection of Turkey’s diverse cultural heritage and thousands of years of history.

The Grand Bazaar, or “Kapalicarsi,” in Istanbul is a unique combination of fantastic merchandise and a memorable shopping experience. The Grand Bazaar is a maze of some 4,000 shops, selling treasures of every type. Still the commercial center of the old city, the Grand Bazaar’s 80 roads and streets form the original shopping mall. For more information, visit www.grand-bazaar.com, where you can find a map of the Grand Bazaar and a list of shops.

What is a Turkish bath (Hamam)?

Communal baths were used in Roman and Byzantine times, but as the name “Turkish Bath” suggests, they played a significant role in Ottoman culture. At a time when the concept of cleanliness was not yet accepted in Europe, the Turks were very fastidious due to Islam’s emphasis on cleanliness. Countless baths were built in the typical Ottoman architectural style throughout the empire. Unfortunately, few have survived to the present. Cagaloglu Hamami and Cemberlitas Hamami, both in Istanbul, are very popular with tourists.

A classic bath usually has three sections: changing rooms, a hot room and a cold room. After entering the hamam and exchanging one’s clothes for a “pestamal” or towel, you then proceed to the “gobek tasi”, a large heated stone where you perspire and are rubbed down by a bath attendant. If the heat proves too much, you can retire to a cooler room. This method of bathing is the most refreshing.